Track Math
03/09/2009 2:59:27 PM
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Joined: Feb 2007
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Professor, you are the math teacher. So please help. If a runner is running 3 strides a second and their stride is 7 feet 6 inches, how fast are they running? Also, what is the formula to find the answer? Can you convert the answer to MPH? What would their time be at 200 meters? Thank you in advance
Professor, you are the math teacher. So please help.

If a runner is running 3 strides a second and their stride is 7 feet 6 inches, how fast are they running? Also, what is the formula to find the answer? Can you convert the answer to MPH?

What would their time be at 200 meters?

Thank you in advance
03/09/2009 4:17:00 PM
Coach
Joined: May 2005
Posts: 14
15.340909090 MPH 200m time = 29.163
15.340909090 MPH

200m time = 29.163
03/09/2009 5:56:40 PM
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Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 226
[quote=KYinNC]Professor, you are the math teacher. So please help. If a runner is running 3 strides a second and their stride is 7 feet 6 inches, how fast are they running? Also, what is the formula to find the answer? Can you convert the answer to MPH? What would their time be at 200 meters? Thank you in advance[/quote] I'm not the Prof, but I teach math as well. I'll teach you how to calculate this if you will try to follow. 3 strides a second x 7 feet and 6 inches (7.5 feet) per stride = 22.5 feet per second The 200 time is the easy one, so I'll show that first. Take the number of feet in a 200 (20000 cm in a 200 meter divided by 30.48 cm in a foot) and divide by the number of feet per second to get the number of seconds it takes to cover 200 meters. (Roughly 656 divided by 22.5) = 29.16 seconds to cover 200 meters For the mile there's just more calculating: Start with the 22.5 ft per second Let's change the seconds into hours first by multiplying the rate by 3600 (number of seconds in an hour) to get 81000 ft per hour. Now, just divide 81000 by the number of feet in a mile (5280) and you have your answer. = 22.5 x 3600 = 81000; 81000 / 5280 = 15.34 MPH
KYinNC wrote:
Professor, you are the math teacher. So please help.

If a runner is running 3 strides a second and their stride is 7 feet 6 inches, how fast are they running? Also, what is the formula to find the answer? Can you convert the answer to MPH?

What would their time be at 200 meters?

Thank you in advance


I'm not the Prof, but I teach math as well. I'll teach you how to calculate this if you will try to follow.

3 strides a second x 7 feet and 6 inches (7.5 feet) per stride
= 22.5 feet per second

The 200 time is the easy one, so I'll show that first.

Take the number of feet in a 200 (20000 cm in a 200 meter divided by 30.48 cm in a foot) and divide by the number of feet per second to get the number of seconds it takes to cover 200 meters. (Roughly 656 divided by 22.5)
= 29.16 seconds to cover 200 meters

For the mile there's just more calculating:

Start with the 22.5 ft per second

Let's change the seconds into hours first by multiplying the rate by 3600 (number of seconds in an hour) to get 81000 ft per hour. Now, just divide 81000 by the number of feet in a mile (5280) and you have your answer.
= 22.5 x 3600 = 81000; 81000 / 5280 = 15.34 MPH
03/09/2009 6:17:25 PM
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Joined: Sep 2006
Posts: 226
To add on, here are some 1500 to 1600 and 3000 to 3200 conversion: Take the number of seconds it took to complete the race and multiply it by the distance you want to convert it to. Ex1. [b]4:09 1500[/b] --> 249 seconds x 1600 meters = 398400 Ex2. [b]11:17 3000[/b] --> 677 seconds x 3200 meters = 2166400 Then divide by the actual race distance to get how long it would take to cover the wanted distance in seconds. Ex1. 398400 / 1500 = 265.6 seconds --> [b]4:25.6 for 1600 meters[/b] Ex2. 2166400 / 3000 = 722.13 seconds --> [b]12:02.13 for 3200 meters[/b]
To add on, here are some 1500 to 1600 and 3000 to 3200 conversion:

Take the number of seconds it took to complete the race and multiply it by the distance you want to convert it to.

Ex1. 4:09 1500 249 seconds x 1600 meters = 398400
Ex2. 11:17 3000 677 seconds x 3200 meters = 2166400

Then divide by the actual race distance to get how long it would take to cover the wanted distance in seconds.

Ex1. 398400 / 1500 = 265.6 seconds 4:25.6 for 1600 meters
Ex2. 2166400 / 3000 = 722.13 seconds 12:02.13 for 3200 meters
03/09/2009 6:31:45 PM
Coach
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I am a history teacher and I sure am glad my assistant is a math teacher. :-)
I am a history teacher and I sure am glad my assistant is a math teacher.
03/09/2009 9:24:54 PM
Coach
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Posts: 29
Steeplecoach is assuming that the runner will be able to cover another 100 or 200 meters at the exact same pace they averaged in the shorter distance you are converting from. That would not be true if the athlete has run their best at the shorter distance.
Steeplecoach is assuming that the runner will be able to cover another 100 or 200 meters at the exact same pace they averaged in the shorter distance you are converting from. That would not be true if the athlete has run their best at the shorter distance.
03/09/2009 9:44:09 PM
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Joined: Dec 1969
Posts: 120
i could be wrong, but i think he was just giving an example on how you would convert from a 1500 to a 1600 and from a 3000 to a 3200 using those numbers (if he used those numbers at all, i didnt look at it), not necessarily saying that this particular athlete could maintain the pace for that long.
i could be wrong, but i think he was just giving an example on how you would convert from a 1500 to a 1600 and from a 3000 to a 3200 using those numbers (if he used those numbers at all, i didnt look at it), not necessarily saying that this particular athlete could maintain the pace for that long.
03/09/2009 9:45:31 PM
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duplicate post
duplicate post
03/09/2009 11:07:26 PM
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Joined: Jun 2005
Posts: 1289
I guess a few people beat me to the punch. :-) Actually, my area is economics, which you could argue is an applied math.
I guess a few people beat me to the punch.

Actually, my area is economics, which you could argue is an applied math.

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